Past Update (super high res bathymetry/topography)

Added support for some incredibly high-res elevation data, plus support for full GPX import/export (i.e. transfer data back and forth from GPS)

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Dave Steckler <davidsteckler@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, Jun 14, 2012 at 12:46 PM
Subject: Mysticetus Development Update – ESRI ASC support, 1/3 arc second bathy data, full GPS upload/download
To: Dave Steckler <davidsteckler@gmail.com>

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Existing list members: welcome back. There is some cool stuff in the latest Mysticetus release…check out the screenshots below.

People getting this update for the first time – this is the Mysticetus Development Update email. I send an update out approx every week or two as new features are added to the Mysticetus Observation software package. I am always writing code, and this semi-periodic email is how I keep a direct link from the dude writing that code to customers and interested bystanders. I sometimes get new references for others who might be interested in how Mysticetus is progressing, and you were one of those folks.

Everyone: if you don’t want to get one of these updates every 1-2 weeks, drop me a line and I’ll take you off the list.
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New version of the What Is Mysticetus presentation up on the website, click Here to learn what Mysticetus is. I added some more verbiage and screenshots describing how shaded relief bathymetry is now fully integrated into Mysticetus, both visually and analytically.

New Mysticetus version on http://www.mysticetus.com. Get the installer from the Downloads page. This build (32) has some new features:

1. Full support for GPX file import/export. This means you can transfer all routes, tracks and waypoints back and forth between Mysticetus and your GPS whenever and however you want.

  • Easily create transect lines (or other routes) in Mysticetus and upload to your GPS. 
  • Download multiple flight/cruise tracks from your GPS and display or print them with Mysticetus (alongside or instead of Mysticetus’ own track-line)
  • If you create routes some other way (Mapsource, CSV, etc.), you can now load those into and out of Mysticetus easily

2. You can now control which depth layers are displayed – this allows you to change up not only the resolution of the shaded-relief maps displayed, but it can also help you control how hard your PC has to work (big, highly-detailed bathy maps take more computing horsepower)

3. Support for even *higher* resolution shaded relief bathymetry and terrain in the real-time GPS/mapping window – this is accomplished by adding support for ESRI ASC files – yet another format used by the folks at NOAA/NGDC for Digital Elevation Models.

Check out http://www.mysticetus.com/links for a bunch of pointers to great bathymetry/terrain data from NOAA/NGDC that can now be used in Mysticetus, both in real-time when out on a survey, or later for printing out maps of where you went and what you observed.

First, here is the etopo1 data for the world (1 arc second). This is Monterrey Peninsula in central California (what? you can’t tell from the image? 🙂 )

…here is the 3 arc second data the last release of Mysticetus supported (via the NOAA/NGDC coastal relief) …not bad…

Here is what build 32 of Mysticetus – now available on the downloads page – will do in certain areas (1/3 arc second data). We’re down to ~10 meters horizontal resolution – folks on this list from NOAA can correct me if I’m wrong, but this is about as good as it gets.

As another example, here is a recent track line off San Diego (aircraft circling dolphins during a line transect/behavior survey). First, 3 arc second resolution.

And here is 1/3 arc second resolution.

‘course, the displayed data are only as good as the underlying data precision. Note near-shore La Jolla canyon is very well defined, but further out from shore you can clearly see NOAA (or someone) did some interpolating with lower-resolution data (those little polygon-shaped sides to the canyon) to approximate the high resolution of this particular DEM. It’s always fun to look at maps and ponder how they were created, the decisions the cartographers made, etc. 🙂

Please keep sending me comments, suggestions, feature ideas, requests for trial versions, bug reports, faint praise, glowing accolades, latte gift cards, expressions of angst and/or adoration, uplifting philosophical ramblings, depressing rants about your spouse’s shopping habits, or whatever else you feel the need to communicate.

Hope all is well. 🙂

    – Dave


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